Gold Coast Dive Centre

WRECK DIVER COURSE

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WRECK DIVER COURSE

 Who should take this course??

Discover the mystery and history or a wreck site!!

 Whether purpose-sunk as an artificial reef for scuba divers, or lost as the result of an accident, wrecks are fascinating windows to the past. Ships, airplanes and even cars are fascinating to explore and usually teem with aquatic life. Each wreck dive offers a chance for discovery, potentially unlocking a mystery or spying something others have missed. The  Wreck Diver Specialty course is popular because it offers rewarding adventures while observing responsible wreck diving practices.

If you’re at least 15 years old and have earned a Adventure Diver certification or higher, you can enroll in the Wreck Diver Specialty course.

 What you will learn?

 There are many different types of wrecks, some of which are protected by laws that guard their historical and cultural significance. Your training starts by reviewing guidelines for researching and respecting wrecks. During four dives you’ll learn:

 

  • Safety considerations for navigating and exploring wrecks.
  • Surveying and mapping a wreck.
  • Using penetration lines and reels to guide exploration.
  • Techniques to avoid kicking up silt or disturbing the wreck and its inhabitants.

You may be able to get college credits for the Wreck Diver course – asks your instructor.

 

Also, the first dive of this Specialty Diver Course course may credit as an Adventure Dive toward your Advance Open Water Diver certification – ask your instructor about earning credit.

When can I start this course?

 Get a Wreck Diver Manual and Wreck Diving video at Gold Coast Dive Centre when you enroll in the course. Read the manual and watch the video before meeting with your Instructor to discuss the wrecks you’ll visit during your open water scuba dives.

Gear Required for Drift Diver Course

 You’ll need yourbasic scuba equipment, plus a dive torch to see into the wreck, a slate and underwater compass for mapping and navigation, and a line and reel for practicing wreck penetration. Your  Instructor at Gold Coast Dive Centre may suggest other gear appropriate for wreck diving in your area.

Follow Next steps                              

A few sample easy steps

 

    • Get in contact with us by Phone or email us your enquiry
    • Sign up online on 
    • Book Now

 

  • We will book you in
  • Course duration
  • No Medical Requirements (Unless there is mayor health issues)
  • Medical declaration to be completed on site before the course starts
  • Fee Payment
  • At the end of the course you will received a notification and receive your  WRECK DIVER certification card by mail

 

 

THIS ARE SOME OF THE IMAGES THAT YOU MAY EXPERIENCE ON A WRECK DIVE BUT BELOW IS THE HISTORY OF OUR OWN WRECK DIVE SITE ON THE GOLD COAST

  

WELCOME TO THE SCUBA DIVE WORLD

Scottish Prince                                              

 Gold Coast Dive Centre is proud to visit this Iconic site where the Scottish Prince vessel has sank many years ago, as a local /tourist attraction is an unforgettable experience not to be missed for any scuba diver that wants to explore the unknown a bit further.

 History;

 Scottish Prince

Scottish Prince

The SCOTTISH PRINCE, launched in Aberdeen in 1878, was a 64 meters steel masted iron barque of 950 tons. She came to grief in early on the morning of the 3rd Feb 1887 with a cargo of iron, beer, whiskey and other goods whilst bound for Brisbane. She now lies in 10 meters of water almost 2 kilometers south of the Gold Coast Seaway, and approximately 800 meters from the beach. Today it serves as a popular dive site.

     This is one of the treasures found in the boat

 

Sir William Wallace

 

SCOTTISH PRINCE

OF LONDON, GEORGE SCALE, MASTER, BURTHEN 894 TONS
FROM THE PORT OF TOWNSVILLE TO SYDNEY, NEW SOUTH WALES, 22 JANUARY 1881

Surname

Given name

Station

Age

Of what Nation

Status

Comments

SCALE

GEORGE

MASTER

 

 

CREW

 

MOWAT

? R

1ST MATE

32?

ORKNEY

CREW

 

KNOWLES

?A F

2ND MATE

30 ?

BRISTOL

CREW

 

FLEMBER

?

3RD MATE

19

SURREY

CREW

 

SILVER

? DREW

CARPENTER

35

IRVINE

CREW

 

ANDERSON

? NY

A. B. & BOATSWAIN

24

ABERDEEN

CREW

 

OLSEN

?

A. B. & SAILMAKER

31

NORWAY

CREW

 

A CAVE

? GE

PURSER & STEWARD

24

ABERDEEN

CREW

 

PAYNE

?

COOK

55

SHOREHAM

CREW

 

WATERS

FRANCIS

A. B.

27

DEVON

CREW

 

DOHERTY

? US

A. B.

25

LDERRY

CREW

 

ANDERSON

? R

A. B.

25

FINLAND

CREW

 

OLSEN

? N

A. B.

30

NORWAY

CREW

 

THOMPSON

?ORGE

A. B.

35

DENMARK

CREW

 

MILLS

?ORGE

A. B.

43

PORTSMOUTH

CREW

 

FORD

?HN

O. S.

19

CANADA

CREW

 

MARKHAM

?

ENGINE DRIVER

25

LONDON

CREW

 

MOULTIN DE GARIUS

?

APPRENTICE

21

 

CREW

 

DANIELS

?Y SPENCER

APPRENTICE

18

 

CREW

 

SCATTERGOOD

?AMES HOLMES

APPRENTICE

18

 

CREW

 

ASKERLING

A

A. B.

23

SWEDEN

CREW

 

 

Source: State Records Authority of New South Wales: Shipping Master's Office; Passengers Arriving 181922; NRS13278, [X150-151] reels 444-445.   Transcribed by Brenda Millar, 2005

 

McIlwraith MacEacharn / "The Scottish Line"

Andrew McIlwraith and Malcolm MacEacharn originally founded the firm of McIlwraith MacEacharn in London on February 1st 1875 when they began business as shipping and insurance agents. A year later they entered the ranks of ship owners following an agreement with the State of Queensland for the carriage of migrants from Britain to Queensland ports north of Mary borough. Their first vessel, the Scottish Bard was completed in April 1876 and in the same year the Scottish Hero and Scottish Knight, were delivered. In 1877 the Scottish Lassie joined the fleet and during the next year the Scottish Admiral and Scottish Prince were completed. Additional to these vessels the wooden barque Sir William Wallace was acquired in 1879.
These vessels were all employed carrying immigrants until 1880 when the Queensland Government arrange a contract with the British India Associated Steamers. Thereafter the sailing ships continued to trade to Australia, particularly in the carriage of wool, primary produce and passengers to Britain. They were however also to be seen in the U.S., Chile and wherever else suitable cargoes offered. Just prior to 1880 a further vessel had been purchased the wooden barque City of Aberdeen, while in 1881 the last of the Scottish ships was completed and named Scottish Wizard.

The line by this time had become known as the Scottish Line but that title fell into disuse with the final disposal of the sailing ships, although it is interesting to note that all the buildings presently occupied by the company in Australia are called "Scottish House." These sailing vessels have been described as handsome clipper-built ships with a reputation for a reasonable turn of speed and according to one report in 1886 the Scottish Wizard made the passage from Bristol to Melbourne in 92 days. The only major accident was in 1880 when the Scottish Bard struck a shoal near Sandy Cape, Queensland and had to be beached to prevent her from sinking. She was subsequently repaired.
In 1879 the company chartered the steamer Strathleven for a round voyage to Australia and before her departure from London she was fitted with the Bell-Coleman mechanical refrigeration plant. On the return passage from Australia an experimental shipment of 30 tons of frozen beef with 2 tons of butter were carried and when the Strathleven ultimately arrived back in London in February the shipments were found to be in excellent condition. A special luncheon was held on board to celebrate this first successful shipment from Australia.

The first two steamers were introduced to the fleet in 1884, the sisters Cloncurry and New Guinea both over 2,500 tons. They made their first appearance in Australian waters under charter to the British India Steam Navigation Company at the end of 1884 when they arrived in Brisbane with migrants. The same year the Sir William Wallace was sold and Scottish Prince lost when she stranded near Southport Queensland in 1887. Also in 1887 the steel barque Frances Fisher was bought. By virtue of their vessels trading to Queensland ports the company developed other interests in the state and the London office operated an extensive mercantile and export department. A branch of the company was established in Melbourne in1887 and subsequently branches were opened in Newcastle, Sydney, Adelaide, Perth and Freemantle. All of these exist today.
During 1893 the company began to dispose of its sailing ships. The Scottish Hero and Frances Fisher were sold in 1893 and the Scottish Bard the following year. The Scottish Admiral was sunk in a collision in 1894 and the cargo steamer Eddystone, which had been in trouble the previous year was wrecked near Cossack, West Australia in September 1894. The Scottish Lassie was sold in 1895 and in February the following year the Scottish Knight sank after a collision off Cornwall while nearing the end of a passage from Tocopilla to Leith.

With the expansion of the company's interests in Australia Malcolm MacEacharn had settled in Melbourne about the time that a branch was opened and during his years in this country he took a leading part in public affairs, becoming a Commissioner of the Melbourne Harbour Trust in 1893 and in the same year was returned as a member of the Melbourne City Council ultimately becoming the city's second Lord Mayor. In 1900 he was knighted and in 1901 elected to represent Melbourne in the first federal parliament.
Four years later Sir Malcolm returned to Scotland and died in 1910 at the age of 58. His partner Andrew McIlwraith outlived him by many years dying in 1932 in his 90th year.

Many thanks to Fraser Morrison of Inverness and Ted Finch for their assistance in collecting this data. The following list was extracted from various sources. This is not an all inclusive list but should only be used as a guide. If you would like to know more about a vessel, visit the Ship Descriptions (onsite) or Immigrant Ship web site.

Fleet - Sailing Ships:

Vessel

Built

Years in Service

Tons

City of Aberdeen

1862

wooden barque, 1879 purchased by McIlwraith MacEachern, 1889 sold to Norway, 1891 renamed Louis, 29th Mar.1893 abandoned in Atlantic on voyage Halifax NS to Barry, Wales.

586

Frances Fisher

1885

barque, 1887 purchased from Frances Fisher Sailings Co. (Chadwick Wainright & Co.), Liverpool. 1893 sold to Liverpool owners. 17th Nov.1909 abandoned near Royal Sovereign Lightship after collision with s/s DALMATIA. Beached near St. Valery-en-Caux, France. Refloated and then beached near Dieppe. 1st Dec.1909 broke up.

1,477

Scottish Admiral

1878

barque, Feb.1894 sunk in collision.

986

Scottish Bard

1876

barque, 1894 sold to Denmark renamed Thor, Aug.1900 abandoned at sea in the South Atlantic.

850

Scottish Hero

1876

barque, 1893 sold to A. H. Arnold, Brake, Germany renamed Saturnus, 1905 sold to Norway, 1914 sold to Sweden, 13th Oct.1915 abandoned in North Atlantic on voyage Miramichi to Cork with timber.

911

Scottish Knight

1876

barque, Feb.1896 sank in tow after collision with Longships in fog off Cornwall on voyage Tocopilla to Leith with nitrate.

916

Scottish Lassie

1877

barque, 1895 sold to France renamed Alexandria, 1925 scrapped.

849

Scottish Prince

1878

barque, Feb.1887 stranded and broke up near Southport, Queensland.

950

Scottish Wizard

1881

barque, 1900 sold to Italy renamed Pasquale Lauro, 1917 went missing at sea.

1,209

Sir William Wallace

1866

wooden barque, 1879 purchased by McIlwraith MacEachern, 1890 hulked at Sydney NSW.

968

 

Funnel:
Red with black top

Fleet - Passenger Steamships:

 

 

Vessel

Built

Years in Service

Tons

Cloncurry

1884

1885 - 1888 chartered to British India S.N. Co., 3rd Jan.1890 sunk in collision with s/s MAPLEBRANCH in Suez Bay, later refloated and repaired, 1905 sold to Japan renamed Yoneyama Maru

2,579

New Guinea

1884

1885 - 1889 chartered to British India S.N. Co., 13th Feb.1911 wrecked in Disaster Bay on voyage Melbourne to Sydney.

2,674

Tripulation of the boat

This will be one of many experiences that you as a diver will encounter under water, to see the treasures, history and mystery of a wreck dive.

 WELCOME TO THE SCUBA DIVE WORLD

About GCDC

The Gold Coast Dive Centre opened it's doors to the public well over 3 years ago. It is an exciting company in the scuba dive market with many years of experience behind the team.

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Crew made you feel at ease, especially when diving for the first time. Great experience, would definitely recommend it.

Maria Koulianos

Sydney, NSW

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